A Week of APAG - December 2018

We have had an exciting week of APAG-related events!

Fourth Annual APAG Seminar

Photography archivists, curators, lawyers, appraisers, collection holders, and conservators gathered at the International Center for Photography in New York City. Along with other panels, presentations, and workshops, Alla Efimova, Loren Miller, and Mary Engel (APAG president and founder) presented projects in a panel titled “Museum Curators: How Do They Find Work for their Exhibitions and Collections?”

Visit the APAG website for seminar details and links.

Dr. Loren Miller, Alla Efimova, and Mary Engel presenting “Museum Curators: How Do They Find Work for their Exhibitions and Collections?,” December 8, 2018. ICP, New York, NY.

Dr. Loren Miller, Alla Efimova, and Mary Engel presenting “Museum Curators: How Do They Find Work for their Exhibitions and Collections?,” December 8, 2018. ICP, New York, NY.

APAG West Event

In San Francisco, APAG West and the Appraisers Association of America hosted a panel on the market for a posthumous photographic collection. Promoters of Arthur Rothstein’s work, Annie Segan and Brodie Hefner presented on his New Deal photographs, social, and artistic legacies. Lindsay Nivens-Frosini discussed issues of valuation and appraisal that come up when working with photographic works. The event was held at Canessa Gallery, in conjunction with the newly opened exhibition, When Government Worked: New Deal Picture Stories by Arthur Rothstein.

Panel: Lindsay Nivens-Frosini, Melanie Light, Brodie Hefner, and Annie Segan. December 6, 2018. Canessa Gallery, San Francisco, CA.

Panel: Lindsay Nivens-Frosini, Melanie Light, Brodie Hefner, and Annie Segan. December 6, 2018. Canessa Gallery, San Francisco, CA.

Sonya Rapoport: An Aesthetic Response at Casemore Kirkeby

Sonya Rapoport: An Aesthetic Response at Casemore Kirkeby

January 12 - January 26, 2019

Opening: Saturday January 12, 6-8pm

In 1970, Berkeley, California based artist Sonya Rapoport was using traditional media to produce paintings on canvas. By the end of the decade she was programming computers to analyze and plot data, creating works on paper that function as portraits of her data body. This wide ranging exhibition of paintings and works on paper reveals the rapid evolution of this prescient artist, one which reflects the transformation of high modernist culture into our present information society.

KunstWorks is pleased to be working with on this special exhibition in collaboration with the Sonya Rapoport Legacy Trust.

Sonya Rapoport,  Lavender Grey , 1973. Pencil, acrylic, and airbrush on canvas, 72” x 142”.

Sonya Rapoport, Lavender Grey, 1973. Pencil, acrylic, and airbrush on canvas, 72” x 142”.

Sonya Rapoport (b. 1923, Brookline, MA; d. 2015, Berkeley, CA) was a conceptual artist best known for a visual language that appropriated the aesthetics of science and digital media. Her work is characterized by groundbreaking experimentation with computers and data collection, collaboration with eminent scientists and experts in the humanities, a fascination with categorization and systems of knowledge, a consistent reinvestigation of her own earlier work, and a profound feminist mission marked by strategic forays into male dominated fields. Her career represents a unique path from high modernist painting to contemporary conceptual and new media work.

Among the first women to receive an M.A. in Painting (UC Berkeley, 1949), Rapoport’s Abstract Expressionist work was given a solo exhibition at the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in 1963. She went on to explore pattern, painting on printed fabrics and developing a personal pictographic vocabulary using recontextualized stencils. In 1976 Rapoport began drawing on found computer printout paper, eventually leading to her reinvention as a digital artist. Her interactive installations used computer programs to gather, process, and represent data. An integral part of a community of artists experimenting with emerging computer technologies in the early 1980’s, Rapoport had an active role in MIT Press’ art, science, and technology journal Leonardo. Critical recognition of Rapoport’s contributions gained momentum in the last decade of her life.

Rapoport leaves a 66-year artistic legacy that includes works in a variety of media, including paintings, works on paper, performance artifacts, books, videos, and web art. Her name is recognized nationally and internationally through her participation in over fifty major exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial (2006), Bienal de Arte, Buenos Aires (2002), Zero1 Biennial, Silicon Valley (2012), Violence Without Bodies, Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid (2005), and Documenta 8, Kassel, Germany (1987). She was the subject of late-career retrospective exhibitions at KALA Art Institute, Berkeley (2011), Mills College Art Museum, Oakland (2012), The Fresno Art Museum (2013) and the book Pairing of Polarities: The Life and Art of Sonya Rapoport, edited by Terri Cohn (Heyday, 2012). Her archives are preserved in the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley.


Casemore Kirkeby
1275 Minnesota Street, #102
San Francisco, CA 94107
415.851.9808

info@casemorekirkeby.com

Gallery Hours 
Tuesday – Saturday, 11am – 6pm

https://casemorekirkeby.com/exhibition/sonya-rapoport-an-aesthetic-response/

Jeannie O'Connor's HIV+ Photo Portraits Acquired by the SF Public Library

Jeannie O'Connor,  John, Oakland , 1988. Silver gelatin print, 4 x 5 inches.

Jeannie O'Connor, John, Oakland, 1988. Silver gelatin print, 4 x 5 inches.

Jeannie O'Connor,  Lovers Laughing, Oakland , 1988. Silver gelatin print, 4 x 5 inches.

Jeannie O'Connor, Lovers Laughing, Oakland, 1988. Silver gelatin print, 4 x 5 inches.

In the early 1990s, photographer Jeannie O'Connor was invited to be a guest artist at four Bay Area AIDS centers, including the Center for AIDS Services in Oakland, the Rest Stop and Shanti House centers on Market Street in San Francisco, and the Unity Church in Richmond.. She worked with HIV-positive clients and their families to take self-portraits, for many of them final, with a 4x5 camera using Polaroid film. O'Connor handed the pneumatic shutter-release bulb to the sitters, so they could choose the timing and the pose. The portrait sitters kept the instantly available prints while O'Connor kept the negatives. 365 negatives have now become an important visual testament to the diversity of lives lost.

KunstWorks is pleased to announce that O’Connor’s negatives, contact sheets, proof prints, and Polaroid prints from the AIDS Self-Portraits Collection (1989-1995) were recently included in the collection of the San Francisco Public Library. They will be made available to the public and a portion will become digitally available online through the Library’s AIDS archives digitization grant, “The San Francisco Bay Area’s Response to the AIDS Epidemic: Digitizing, Reuniting, and Providing Universal Access to Historical AIDS Records.” Learn about the Bay Area’s major AIDS archives digitization project, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.


O’Connor at the San Francisco Public Library’s History Center.

O’Connor at the San Francisco Public Library’s History Center.

Jeannie O'Connor's work has been shown internationally and was awarded the SECA award by SFMOMA and the Phelan award in Photography. She taught art and photography at California College of the Arts, the San Francisco Art Institute, and Berkeley City College.

O'Connor graduated from UC Berkeley in 1969 with a master's degree in painting. Throughout her career, she has taken portraits, often combining photographic images with paint, pastel, and collage. The 4 x 5 polaroid Type 55 self-portrait process offered a means to work sensitively and responsibly across many situations, including at Creative Growth Art Center and for the California Arts Council AIDS project.

APAG West Seminar a Success

APAG West Seminar a Success

KunstWorks was happy to co-host American Photography Archives Group West’s inaugural seminar. Alla Efimova, Melanie Light, and Alan Selsor chaired the committee to recruit a stellar line up of speakers—curators, photography archive managers, and attorneys—to address the most important topics in advancing the legacies of contemporary photographers. It was a busy day of presentations on photography archives and collections, issues in photographers’ legacy planning, and lively discussions. We are planning engaging events and workshops throughout the year, and look forward to the next year’s seminar in the Fall of 2019.

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Eva Joseph's prints and paintings dazzle

Eva Joseph,  Untitled , ca. 1985. Print. 15 1/2 x 20 inches.

Eva Joseph, Untitled, ca. 1985. Print. 15 1/2 x 20 inches.

KunstWorks is pleased to share the treasure trove of rarely seen prints and paintings by Eva Joseph, the brilliant German-American artist whose work blends Bay Area Figurative painting with midcentury modern graphic design and the technique of Japanese woodblock printing. This website dedicated to her work is an important new resource to understand the artist’s unique contribution to West Coast painting and Bay Area art history.

Explore the website at https://www.evajoseph.com.

Eva Joseph,  Untitled , n.d. Oil on canvas. 36 x 36 inches.

Eva Joseph, Untitled, n.d. Oil on canvas. 36 x 36 inches.

APAG West Announces Inaugural Seminar

We are delighted to announce that KunstWorks Principal Alla Efimova will chair the committee for the first American Photography Archives Group (APAG) seminar to take place on the West Coast.

Many thanks to Melanie Light and Alan Selsor for helping recruit a stellar line up of speakers—curators, photography archive managers, and attorneys—to address the most important topics in advancing the legacies of contemporary photographers. 

APAG West Inaugural Seminar
Sunday, October 14
UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism
9:30 am – 6:30 pm

View the program for the inaugural APAG West Seminar to learn more about the event. To join APAG as a member and/or register for the seminar, click HERE.

APAGWestSeminarProgramOctober_FINAL.jpg

KunstWorks awarded Berkeley Civic Arts Commission grant for book

Photos and notes are spread out on a table at Nabolom Bakery in Berkeley, where Moira Roth spent time composing her experimental narrative. KunstWorks was recently awarded a grant to transform the project into a publication.

Photos and notes are spread out on a table at Nabolom Bakery in Berkeley, where Moira Roth spent time composing her experimental narrative. KunstWorks was recently awarded a grant to transform the project into a publication.

We are pleased to announce that the Berkeley Civic Arts Commission awarded a grant for developing the book Through the Eyes of Rachel Marker by Moira Roth and edited by Alla Efimova. KunstWorks is working with Roth to publish her experimental novel tracing the life of a fictional protagonist who witnessed firsthand the major events in twentieth-century European history. Mostly unpublished, this lyrical, perceptive, and cautionary tale is more relevant now than ever.

A leading international voice in feminism, performance, and contemporary art, Roth has authored three acclaimed books on art and published dozens of essays in addition to creating her own performance works. She is a professor emerita of art history at Mills College and has taught at various times at UC Irvine, UC Santa Cruz, and UC San Diego. Roth’s pioneering work on artists ranging from Marcel Duchamp to Faith Ringgold and Rachel Rosenthal won her numerous achievement awards, including the 2006 National Recognition in the Arts Award from the College Arts Association.

First Opportunity to View Aulerich-Sugai Cell Painting from 1988

Ed Aulerich-Sugai,  Cells: C-28 , 1988. Water-based media on paper; 43.75 x 35 inches. Collection of the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Ed Aulerich-Sugai, Cells: C-28, 1988. Water-based media on paper; 43.75 x 35 inches. Collection of the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

This summer, the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive will exhibit a rarely seen work by Ed Aulerich-Sugai in the exhibition Way Bay 2. Never publicly shown, the work represents one of a series of mixed media works on paper produced between 1986 – 1989. The Cells series, including over 100 paintings and drawings, displays a broad range in the use of color, form, and texture. In 1988, Aulerich-Sugai completed the painting currently on display at BAMPFA, Cells: C-28, in response to his diagnosis the previous autumn with HIV-related illnesses. The work represents an interrogation of his illness and the virus weakening his immune system. The painting's composition was influenced by Aulerich-Sugai's study of ukiyo-e woodblock prints.

As the second iteration of an innovatively organized exhibition of art, film, performance, poetry, and archival materials, Way Bay 2 continues BAMPFA's wide-ranging exploration of the creative energies that have emerged from the San Francisco Bay Area over two centuries. The exhibition features almost two hundred works by Bay Area artists and others whose work engages directly with the region’s geographic and cultural landscape and highlights dozens of recent acquisitions. Of these new acquisitions, many bring a focus to the ways women and people of color have contributed their voices to historic cultural moments in the Bay. Way Bay 2 is on view at BAMPFA from June 13 – September 2, 2018.

Sonya Rapoport's work finds new audience in 2018

Sonya Rapoport's work finds new audience in 2018

Throughout 2018, Sonya Rapoport's legacy and spirit of experimentation is being highlighted through a number of exhibitions and events across the Bay Area: San Francisco's Minnesota Street Projects featured Rapoport's drawing in a group exhibition organized by Romer Young Gallery; the Berkeley Art Museum exhibited her work in a major collection show; and in an upcoming musical performance, Berkeley's Kala Art Institute will focus on her Anasazi series as a source for new creative interpretations by composer-performer team Hae Voces.

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Acquisitions at BAMPFA to be shown in upcoming exhibition "Way Bay"

Acquisitions at BAMPFA to be shown in upcoming exhibition "Way Bay"

We are pleased to announce that the work of two artists whose estates KunstWorks has advised will be included in the upcoming show Way Bay at the Berkeley Art Museum. Sonya Rapoport's Survey Chart #19 (1971) and Ed Aulerich-Sugai's Ghosts and Demons: Diptych (1989) will be on display at BAMPFA from January 17–May 6, 2018.

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Giving back to art and artists: Carole Doyle Peel exhibition at Kala Art Institute

KunstWorks' Christopher Squier curated the exhibition of Carole Doyle Peel at Kala

KunstWorks' Christopher Squier curated the exhibition of Carole Doyle Peel at Kala

We are proud to have worked with the Estate of Carole Doyle Peel (1934-2016) to realize the artist's vision. Peel was a graduate of University of California Berkeley's Department of Art and taught drawing at California College of the Art for over forty years. On Sunday, April 30, her retrospective exhibition, curated by KunstWorks' Christopher Squier, will open at Kala Art Institute. Proceeds from sales from the exhibition will support students at CCA, where the Carole Doyle Peel Scholarship Fund has been established. Two important works by Peel were added last week to the collection of the Berkeley Art Museum, where a fund in Peel's memory will be used to acquire drawings for the museum's collection.