Art in America Review: Ed Aulerich-Sugai in “With(out) With(in) the very moment”

“Material Witnesses: Art and AIDS at the San Francisco Arts Commission”
by Matt Sussman, Art in America, June 19, 2019

Curated by Margaret Tedesco, the group exhibition highlights under-recognized Bay Area artists whose work centers on queer culture and activism in the 80’s and 90’s to reveal “a fuller history of this era and the various players involved.”

“The exhibition centers on the work of Aulerich-Sugai, who came of age as an artist and a gay man in San Francisco amid the heady days of gay liberation. Although he had maintained an active painting and drawing practice since earning his BA from the San Francisco Art Institute in 1975, Aulerich-Sugai entered into an intensely prolific period of creation that began after he was diagnosed as HIV-positive in 1987 and lasted until his death in 1994.”

Read the full review here.


With(out) With(in) the very moment is on view through June 22, 2019 at the San Francisco Arts Commission main galleries (401 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 126).

Image: Installation view of 'With(out) With(in) the very moment,' at San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, with Ed Aulerich-Sugai's work on the wall. (Photo by Phillip Maisel)

Upcoming Event: About Ed at the SFAC Galleries

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Please join KunstWorks and the Ed Aulerich-Sugai Collection and Archive this week at the San Francisco Arts Commission Galleries for the event, “About Ed: Reading and Conversation with Robert Glück, Alla Efimova, and Daniel Ostrow.”

Event
About Ed: Reading and Conversation with Robert Glück, Alla Efimova, and Daniel Ostrow
Wednesday, May 29, 2019
6:30–8:30 pm

SFAC Community Room
401 Van Ness, Ste. 126,
San Francisco, CA 94102

Description
Centered around the work of Ed Aulerich-Sugai (1950–1994), this event convenes two of the artist's partners, New Narrative writer Robert Glück and clinical social worker Daniel Ostrow, in a reading dedicated to the vibrant life and work of the artist. Glück will read an excerpt of his in-progress novel and AIDS memoir About Ed. Ostrow will read selections from a chapter he contributed to A History of AIDS Social Work in Hospitals, a moving reflection on caregiving and love. The readings will be followed by a conversation with the curator and art historian Alla Efimova, who has been working with Glück and Ostrow on bringing Aulerich-Sugai's artwork into the public eye a quarter century after the artist's passing. Efimova will introduce strategic legacy planning for artists's estates—the primary focus of KunstWorks, a Berkeley-based consulting agency she founded.

Alla Efimova, PhD, is the Founder and Principal of KunstWorks. As an art historian, curator, and museum director, she has been a strong advocate for artists' rights and strategic legacy planning. Efimova is the author of several books and catalogs and numerous articles and serves on the boards of regional and national cultural organizations. She has taught the history of modern and contemporary art for over two decades.

Poet, fiction writer, editor, and New Narrative theorist Robert Glück has served as director of San Francisco State University’s Poetry Center, co-director of the Small Press Traffic Literary Center, and associate editor at Lapis Press. He is the author of eleven books, including two novels, Margery Kempe and Jack the Modernist, and, most recently, Communal Nude: Collected Essays. In 2019, Margery Kempewill be republished by New York Review of Books Classics.  Glück edited, with Camille Roy, Mary Berger and Gail Scott, the anthology Biting The Error: Writers Explore Narrative. In his current novel/AIDS memoir, About Ed, Glück borrows from Aulerich-Sugai’s decades of dream journals. 

Psychotherapist Daniel Ostrow was Aulerich-Sugai's last partner. Ostrow had a career in hospital ambulatory care spanning 32 years. He established the first publicly funded HIV primary and subspecialty care clinic at a private medical center in San Francisco. He also co-designed and directed the first rehabilitation unit for people with severe AIDS-related dementia in the United States. His approach to his work was influenced by his relationship with Aulerich-Sugai, developing a deep understanding of the effect of life threatening illness. He addressed this interplay in a keynote, “Approaches to Caregiving: Professional and Personal Perspectives” at The Fifth International Conference on Social Work and AIDS in 1993.


The event is organized in conjunction with the exhibition With(out) With(in) the very moment at the SFAC Galleries, curated by Margaret Tedesco.

Upcoming SOMArts exhibition reflects on precarity, features work by Ed Aulerich-Sugai

Image credit: Bernice Bing, courtesy of the Bernice Bing estate

Image credit: Bernice Bing, courtesy of the Bernice Bing estate

Creative Labor presents: Precarious Lives opening reception
Thursday, June 6–Saturday, June 29, 2019
SOMArts Cultural Center, 934 Brannan Street

Precarious Lives marks the 22nd annual National Queer Arts Festival visual arts exhibition hosted by SOMArts Cultural Center. This year’s Creative Labor exhibition opens its field of view beyond its primary focus on creating a site of visibility for queer art to include the work of non-queer identified artists whose work has been instrumental in building the social and aesthetic network within which we understand and experience cultural difference and our own queerness. The exhibition looks outward from the public space SOMArts has created over the years—a safe, welcoming, inclusive physical place that affirms our presence as valued art-workers in our increasingly unsettled times.

Building on the foundational work of philosopher Judith Butler’s notion of “precarity,” the term is used in the context of this exhibition as a condition that expresses the fundamental vulnerability of life. It points to an unsettled state of being on the verge of collapse, open to violence, subject to dispossession, heightened risk of physical and emotional breakdown, even premature death. It asks whose lives are worthy of visibility, of care. Whose lives lie beyond social norms and acceptance? Whose lives are erased, distorted or excluded from recognition by economic instability, cultural prejudice or legal status? And from this precarious position, it locates a site from which political demands and principles emerge and unfold in a multiplicity of aesthetic acts as resistance and affirmation. Precarity “implies living socially, the fact that one’s life is always in some sense in the hands of the other. It implies exposure both to those we know and to those we do not know; a dependency on people we know, or barely know, or know not at all.” This interdependent existence of precariousness holds political potentiality and opens us to the type of responsive action operating in the art/work presented in this exhibition. As Creative Labor (Queer Artists Working Group), we seek to express the fullness of our queerness in this reflection as self with others—in this interdependence, vulnerability and care.

BACKGROUND
Precarious Lives is the third and final installment of a trilogy of exhibitions titled, The Turning, Queerly curated by Rudy Lemcke for Creative Labor. This project proposes a reframing of the idea of queer subjectivity as autonomous self-in-need-of-liberation to consider the self as self-with-others as the condition of possibility for modes of thinking about queerness in our technological age of networked connectivity (Self to #Selfie, 2017); it explores the sometimes-violent socio-political frame into which our identities have been thrown (A History of Violence, 2018); and considers the underlying conditions of human vulnerability as the site of care and futurity realized through the transformational labor of art (Precarious Lives, 2019).

Ed Aulerich-Sugai,  Xray  series, 1980. Acrylic. 45 x 30 inches.

Ed Aulerich-Sugai, Xray series, 1980. Acrylic. 45 x 30 inches.

CURATOR
Rudy Lemcke

EXHIBITING ARTISTS
Marlon Riggs
Barbara Hammer
Lordes Portillo
Lenore Chinn
Rhodessa Jones
Carlos Loarca
René Yanez
Guillermo Gómez-Peña
Nancy Hom
Justin Hoover
Michelle Tea
Bernice Bing
Madeleine Lim
Tina Takemoto
Annie Sprinkle and Beth Stephens
Flo Wong
Ester Hernandez
Ed Aulerich-Sugai
Sean Dorsey
Shawna Virago
Marcela Pardo Ariza
Scott MacLeod
Mia Nakano/Visibility Project
Katie Gilmartin

QUEER ANCESTORS PROJECT
Jorge Mata Flores
Joan Chen
Amman Desai
Corey Brown
Weyam
Sasha Solomonov
Amari Robinson
Renée Jones
Eva Ovalle

CULTURE STRIKE
Agana
Micah Bazant
Kevin Caplicki
Thea Gahr
Thomas Greyeyes
Nicolas Lampert
Fernando Marti
Colin Matthes
Mazatl
Nicolas Medina
Roger Peet
Gilda Posada
Jesse Purcell
Pete Railand
Favianna Rodriguez
Julio Salgado
Meredith Stern
David Tim
Rommy Torrico
Mary Tremonte
Erin Yoshi
Bec Young

Precarious Lives Film, Literary and Performance Series
at SOMArts Cultural Center

Thursday, June 6th
Opening Reception and Film Screening of Tongues Untied by Marlon T. Riggs

Tuesday, June 11th
Performance Night | Curated by Micia Mosely

Tuesday, June 18th
Literary/Spoken Word Night | Curated by Audaciously Speaking

Tuesday, June 25th
Experimental Film Night | Curated by Malic Amalya

With(out) With(in) the very moment: Eight Artists Reflect on Living during the Gay Liberation Movement through HIV/AIDS Activism at the San Francisco Art Commission Galleries

Ed Aulerich-Sugai,  He Cries, She Cries, Homage to Our Sisters  (detail), 1988. Chalk pastel and mixed media on paper. Courtesy of The Ed Aulerich-Sugai Collection and Archive

Ed Aulerich-Sugai, He Cries, She Cries, Homage to Our Sisters (detail), 1988. Chalk pastel and mixed media on paper. Courtesy of The Ed Aulerich-Sugai Collection and Archive

The San Francisco Art Commission Galleries will host the work of Ed Aulerich-Sugai in the group exhibition With(out) With(in) the very moment, curated by Margaret Tedesco. A reading and conversation with Robert Glück, Alla Efimova, and Daniel Ostrow will follow on Wednesday, May 29 at 6:30 p.m. The exhibition is on view from April 18–June 22.

Event:
Opening Reception: Thursday, April 18
Location: SFAC Main Gallery, 401 Van Ness, Suite 126, San Francisco, CA 94610
Tickets: No tickets. No RSVP. Free and open to the public
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/370603123791544/

From the press release:

SAN FRANCISCO - There were many moments that collectively sparked the gay liberation movement, most notably the Stonewall riots in 1969. Through the late 1960s and the 1980s, activism was a vital part of queer culture prompting visibility, pride, and kinship within the LGBTQ community. The growing HIV/AIDS epidemic spurred another wave of activism in the 1980s and 1990s that called for care and funds to cure the disease that killed many in the community. Curated by artist Margaret Tedesco, the SFAC Galleries’ exhibition With(out) With(in) the very moment features artists who lived through these moments, creating works that have and continue to bear witness to the events that have shaped the community.

Opening Reception – Thursday, April 18, 6 – 8 p.m.

According to Tedesco, “This show attempts to revisit a lineage common among artists in the 1980s who witnessed and embodied the activism and community—and to continue our discourse that effects all of our lives today.”

The exhibition originated out of the work of Ed Aulerich-Sugai, an artist, writer, gardener, and AIDS activist, who died of AIDS-related complications in 1994. His work drew from Japanese mythology and iconography as well as from his work as a gardener at the San Francisco Conservatory of Flowers, pulling these inspirations to create works that spoke about spirituality, disease, strength, and an awareness of our own transience.

With Aulerich-Sugai’s work at its center, With(out) With(in) the very moment also includes work by seven long-time Bay Area artists: Elliot Anderson, Adam J. Ansell, Mark M. Garrett, Cliff Hengst, Nancer LeMoins, Mark Paron, and writer Anton Stuebner. Their work spans painting, sculpture, video, photography, and writing, using various media to tell shared histories and to articulate all that they have witnessed.

In addition to the works by the artists, the exhibition will also feature ALTERNATE ENDINGS, a series of video programs organized by Visual AIDS for Day With(out) Art, an annual event held on World AIDS Day where museums and other organizations present programs in response to the ongoing HIV/AIDS epidemic and remember those who have been lost. SFAC Galleries will be screening all three recent iterations of ALTERNATE ENDINGS, from 2014, 2017, and 2018, which includes videos by My Barbarian, AIDS Coalition To Unleash Power (ACT UP), Brontez Purnell, Cheryl Dunye & Ellen Spiro, Kia LaBeija, Lyle Ashton Harris, and many more.

SFAC Galleries Associate Curator Jackie Im notes, “The activism stemming from the Gay Liberation Movement has reverberations that are still felt today. As advancements have been made towards treating HIV and AIDS, it is so important to remember what was happening on the ground during the most devastating years of the epidemic. With(out) With(in) the very moment not only looks back, but also looks at the present and towards the future lineage of this movement.”

Exhibition Details:
Title: With(out) With(in) the very moment
Dates: April 18 – June 22, 2019
Location: SFAC Main Gallery, 401 Van Ness, Suite 126, San Francisco, CA 94610
Curator: Margaret Tedesco
Artists: Elliot Anderson, Adam Ansell, Ed Aulerich-Sugai, Mark Garrett, Cliff Hengst, Nancer Lemoins, Mark Paron, Anton Stuebner, and featuring ALTERNATE ENDINGS, a series of video programs by Visual AIDS for Day With(out) Art.

Public Program Series: Read My Lips…Again

Wednesday, May 1, 6:30 p.m.
Reading with Anton Stuebner followed by a screening of Michael Wallin’s Black Sheep Boy (1995)

Wednesday, May 29, 6:30 p.m.
Reading and conversation with Robert Glück, Alla Efimova, and Daniel Ostrow

Thursday, June 13, 6:30 p.m.
Screening of Criminal Queers (2013) followed by a Q&A with director Eric Stanley

All public programs will take place at the SFAC Main Gallery and are free and open to the public.

Ed Aulerich-Sugai featured exhibitions in 2019

Ed Aulerich-Sugai , Xray  series, 1980. Acrylic. 45 x 30 inches.

Ed Aulerich-Sugai, Xray series, 1980. Acrylic. 45 x 30 inches.

KunstWorks is thrilled to announce two upcoming group exhibitions featuring work from the Ed Aulerich-Sugai Collection and Archive: With(out) With(in) the very moment at the San Francisco Art Commission (SFAC) Galleries; and Precarious Lives, presented by the Queer Cultural Center and Creative Labor at SOMArts Cultural Center.

With(out) With(in) the very moment is organized by independent curator Margaret Tedesco for the SFAC Galleries, and will highlight Aulerich-Sugai’s artwork from the late 1980s alongside the work of artists living with HIV today. The show includes selections from Aulerich-Sugai’s series Ghosts and Demons and Power in Storage: Samurai Masks and Helmets, as well as a unique four-panel work on paper from 1988 titled He Cries, She Cries: Homage to our Sisters. This large work presents a moving narrative of anguish at the cellular level. The exhibition runs from April 18–June 22.

Precarious Lives will be the third and final installment of a trilogy of exhibitions titled The Turning, Queerly curated by Rudy Lemcke for Creative Labor. Precarious Lives builds on the foundational work of philosopher Judith Butler’s notion of “precarity.” The term is used in the context of this exhibition as a condition that expresses the fundamental vulnerability of life. Lemcke considers the underlying conditions of human vulnerability as the site of care and futurity realized through the transformational labor of art. The exhibition features a painting from Aulerich-Sugai’s series Xrays, which depicts skeletal images of hands and wrists, and will be on view at SOMArts Cultural Center from June 6–29.

Ed Aulerich-Sugai,  He Cries, She Cries , from  Cells  (1987-1991), 1988. 38 x 25 inches per panel; 38 x 100 inches overall.

Ed Aulerich-Sugai, He Cries, She Cries, from Cells (1987-1991), 1988. 38 x 25 inches per panel; 38 x 100 inches overall.

In 1987, following his diagnosis with HIV-related illness, Aulerich-Sugai began a series of drawings and paintings called Cells, which includes over 100 paintings and drawings. From oil on canvas to mixed media on paper, the work displays a broad range of approaches to color, abstraction, and form. The series represents the artist’s process of “looking at the virus inside,” examining the body at a cellular and molecular level as a step toward regaining control over it.

“Being diagnosed with ARC profoundly affected my life, but I found that telling my family and friends equally traumatized them,” Aulerich-Sugai wrote. “I wanted to show that trauma, and deep sadness in ‘Homage to Our Sisters.’

Similarly, the Xray paintings visualize the structures of the body beneath the skin, making unsettling and ghostly images out of clinical documents.

Ed Aulerich-Sugai (1950–1994) was an Asian American artist, writer, gardener, and AIDS activist. Primarily a representational painter, he drew inspiration from traditional Japanese mythology and iconography, which he transformed through a contemporary lens. His work also draws upon the anatomy of humans and animals to explore the power and fragility of life. Aulerich-Sugai died of AIDS in 1994. A quarter-century later, his work stands as a unique document of his seven-year experience of living with the disease. The oeuvre includes journals, paintings, and works on paper spanning the artist’s career, from the 1970s through the last months of his life.

KunstWorks honors African-American art and history in Berkeley

Between 1940 and 1970, millions of African-Americans left the South, seeking employment opportunities in the North and West. Poverty, lack of educational opportunities, and rigid segregation and discrimination caused the move. Many families established communities in the San Francisco Bay Area, especially Berkeley, where they could find steady work in shipyards, steel construction, and other industries boosted by the wartime efforts and government job programs.They established businesses, churches, community centers, and city infrastructure, impacting Berkeley’s cultural, economic, and social makeup.

Many African Americans who moved from Louisiana, Texas, and Arkansas in this Second Great Migration had reached old age by the late 1970s, when artist Jeannie O’Connor taught photography classes at senior centers in Berkeley. Between 1979 and 1982, O’Connor documented the daily activities of the mostly black senior community, as they gardened, took art classes, exercised, and went on field trips. O’Connor also took portraits of the seniors, and made copies of their family photographs they had brought with them from the South. KunstWorks is working with O’Connor on placing this important visual archive in museums and libraries.

In the 1970s, a Berkeley psychologist Eli Leon (1935-2018) began purchasing quilts made by members of a large community of African-American quilt makers he met at Bay Area flea markets. Most of these quilt makers also belonged to the generation of the Second Great Migration and brought the quilting traditions from the South. Drawn to their irregular, improvisatory patterns, Leon devoted his life to collecting, preserving, and exhibiting this historically significant artwork. His groundbreaking scholarship connected the unique quilting patterns to West and Central African textiles. KunstWorks is working with the Eli Leon Trust to finalize the placement of the collection in major American museums, following Leon’s intent to make the collection publicly available for study and research.

Put-together , pieced by Rosie Lee Tompkins, Richmond, California, 1985. Quilted by Willia Ette Graham, Oakland, California, 1986. Velvet, velveteen, velour, panné velvet, chenille; backed with cotton sheeting, cotton-poly broadcloth. 74 x 82 inches.

Put-together, pieced by Rosie Lee Tompkins, Richmond, California, 1985. Quilted by Willia Ette Graham, Oakland, California, 1986. Velvet, velveteen, velour, panné velvet, chenille; backed with cotton sheeting, cotton-poly broadcloth. 74 x 82 inches.

APAG West Introduction Meeting and Brunch in LA

At Peter Fetterman Gallery (Santa Monica), the new Western affiliate of the American Photography Archive Group—APAG West—held a brunch meeting to introduce the organization to the Southern California community of photographers, archives, and collections. Despite the torrential downpour, steering committee Alla Efimova and Melanie Light led a lively discussion on APAG’s past programming, the future of the organization, and potential programs and events that the community would be interested in. As APAG West continues to expand its reach, we are excited to offer photo seminars, workshops, archive tours, and other unique programs to a larger geographic audience.


APAG Founded in New York over a decade ago, American Photography Archives Group (APAG) is a non-profit membership organization to support photographer’s archives, working photographers, and photographic archivists. Its mission is to help to preserve, document, and exhibit historic photography of the 20th and 21st centuries. Throughout the year APAG meetings provide a supportive and lively forum for exchanging experience and knowledge with others who manage archives and the legacies of modern and contemporary photographers.

APAG West is a new affiliate to extend the same educational and professional opportunities for members in California and the Western States.
www.apag.us/apag-west/

Membership: https://www.apag.us/membership/

Contact: alla@thekunstworks.com
kathryn@thekunstworks.com

Abstraction and Distance: New Paintings in the Carl Heidenreich Foundation Collection

CARL HEIDENREICH,  UNTITLED , N.D. OIL ON CANVAS. 40 X 33.75 INCHES. COLLECTION OF THE CARL HEIDENREICH FOUNDATION.

CARL HEIDENREICH, UNTITLED, N.D. OIL ON CANVAS. 40 X 33.75 INCHES. COLLECTION OF THE CARL HEIDENREICH FOUNDATION.

Included in last year’s additions to the Carl Heidenreich Foundation’s collection are six works, which demonstrate the artist’s shifting focus from representation to the language of abstraction after immigrating to New York after WWII.

In the forward to the 2004 book Carl Heidenreich (Goethe Institut, New York), Dr. Alla Efimova writes about the unique syntax of abstraction employed by Heidenreich in relation to his experience as a refugee:

“Nonrepresentational art served many purposes in the twentieth century. For some it was a way of escaping ethnic marginalization and joining in the visual Esperanto of the international avant-garde. For others it was an assertion of the primacy of inner vision and liberation of the individual. In certain instances nonrepresentation served as a way of rejecting individual creativity and channeling art along paths of design and engineering. And at yet other times artists used it to avoid political connotations of a figurative work. Heidenreich’s late works, however, do not fit neatly into any accepted narrative of twentieth-century Modernism. They are an unusually consistent effort to work through the traumatic experience of immigration.

“Heidenreich recorded one of his first impressions of New York in a watercolor from circa 1942. It is a perspectival sketch of an avenue crossed by an above ground subway line. The artist’s viewpoint is somewhat estranged, detached. He is neither among the people on the street nor ignoring them. The artist here is an onlooker. An oil painting of New York rooftops, dating about a year later, positions the artist behind the windowsill of his apartment. A glass pane and a window frame separate him from the outside. The view is composed of color fields, but the perspectival structure is clearly maintained. The painting conveys a sense of distance; the faraway skyscrapers with brightly lit white blotches of windows stand out against the dusky sky. Heidenreich retreats behind the window that bears marks of its own—a black squiggle on the left side of the work appears to be painted directly on the imagined glass.”

Similarly, Heidenreich’s Window View (c. 1960, shown below) and his Untitled painting (shown above) place the viewer behind a pane of glass or at a distance from their subjects. Window View delineates a cityscape seen from behind the frame of a window. Warm tones of orange and beige separate interior from the vibrant blues, reds, and yellows of the outside world. In Untitled, meanwhile, the purple hues of the window sash and mullions merge with the natural forms of plant life outdoors. Blocks of white paint, like light reflecting off the window, obscure the image of what might exist beyond.

CARL HEIDENREICH,  WINDOW VIEW,  CIRCA 1960. MIXED MEDIA ON PAPER. 32 X 23 INCHES. COLLECTION OF THE CARL HEIDENREICH FOUNDATION.

CARL HEIDENREICH, WINDOW VIEW, CIRCA 1960. MIXED MEDIA ON PAPER. 32 X 23 INCHES. COLLECTION OF THE CARL HEIDENREICH FOUNDATION.

Efimova continues:

“In the paintings and watercolors created in the following two decades, Heidenreich proceeded to paint himself in, to mark and smear the window surface until only faint silhouettes of the outside world can be distinguished through layers and layers of oils, gesso, and wash. In a number of works, a recognizable object shows through, surprisingly, almost accidentally. In a watercolor from the 1950s, a bouquet of pink flowers metamorphoses out of layers of aquarelle. Then the image recedes, as it does in dozens of works in which the recognizable world is scratched out and covered over.”

CARL HEIDENREICH,  UNTITLED  (LANDSCAPE IN WHITE AND BLUE), CIRCA 1961. WATERCOLOR ON PAPER. 21 X 29 INCHES. COLLECTION OF THE CARL HEIDENREICH FOUNDATION.

CARL HEIDENREICH, UNTITLED (LANDSCAPE IN WHITE AND BLUE), CIRCA 1961. WATERCOLOR ON PAPER. 21 X 29 INCHES. COLLECTION OF THE CARL HEIDENREICH FOUNDATION.

“A strong sense of semi-penetrable surface also appears in Heidenreich’s work of the 1960s, the series on Mexico and Alaska. A crumbling stone wall, probably derived from the memory of Mayan ruins, seems to separate the artist from the outside world in the Mexican paintings. A snowy, icy surface, which neither reflects light nor lets it through, stands between the artist and nature in the series of Alaskan watercolors.”

A Week of APAG - December 2018

We have had an exciting week of APAG-related events!

Fourth Annual APAG Seminar

Photography archivists, curators, lawyers, appraisers, collection holders, and conservators gathered at the International Center for Photography in New York City. Along with other panels, presentations, and workshops, Alla Efimova, Loren Miller, and Mary Engel (APAG president and founder) presented projects in a panel titled “Museum Curators: How Do They Find Work for their Exhibitions and Collections?”

Visit the APAG website for seminar details and links.

Dr. Loren Miller, Alla Efimova, and Mary Engel presenting “Museum Curators: How Do They Find Work for their Exhibitions and Collections?,” December 8, 2018. ICP, New York, NY.

Dr. Loren Miller, Alla Efimova, and Mary Engel presenting “Museum Curators: How Do They Find Work for their Exhibitions and Collections?,” December 8, 2018. ICP, New York, NY.

APAG West Event

In San Francisco, APAG West and the Appraisers Association of America hosted a panel on the market for a posthumous photographic collection. Promoters of Arthur Rothstein’s work, Annie Segan and Brodie Hefner presented on his New Deal photographs, social, and artistic legacies. Lindsay Nivens-Frosini discussed issues of valuation and appraisal that come up when working with photographic works. The event was held at Canessa Gallery, in conjunction with the newly opened exhibition, When Government Worked: New Deal Picture Stories by Arthur Rothstein.

Panel: Lindsay Nivens-Frosini, Melanie Light, Brodie Hefner, and Annie Segan. December 6, 2018. Canessa Gallery, San Francisco, CA.

Panel: Lindsay Nivens-Frosini, Melanie Light, Brodie Hefner, and Annie Segan. December 6, 2018. Canessa Gallery, San Francisco, CA.

Sonya Rapoport: An Aesthetic Response at Casemore Kirkeby

Sonya Rapoport: An Aesthetic Response at Casemore Kirkeby

January 12 - January 26, 2019

Opening: Saturday January 12, 6-8pm

In 1970, Berkeley, California based artist Sonya Rapoport was using traditional media to produce paintings on canvas. By the end of the decade she was programming computers to analyze and plot data, creating works on paper that function as portraits of her data body. This wide ranging exhibition of paintings and works on paper reveals the rapid evolution of this prescient artist, one which reflects the transformation of high modernist culture into our present information society.

KunstWorks is pleased to be working with on this special exhibition in collaboration with the Sonya Rapoport Legacy Trust.

Sonya Rapoport,  Lavender Grey , 1973. Pencil, acrylic, and airbrush on canvas, 72” x 142”.

Sonya Rapoport, Lavender Grey, 1973. Pencil, acrylic, and airbrush on canvas, 72” x 142”.

Sonya Rapoport (b. 1923, Brookline, MA; d. 2015, Berkeley, CA) was a conceptual artist best known for a visual language that appropriated the aesthetics of science and digital media. Her work is characterized by groundbreaking experimentation with computers and data collection, collaboration with eminent scientists and experts in the humanities, a fascination with categorization and systems of knowledge, a consistent reinvestigation of her own earlier work, and a profound feminist mission marked by strategic forays into male dominated fields. Her career represents a unique path from high modernist painting to contemporary conceptual and new media work.

Among the first women to receive an M.A. in Painting (UC Berkeley, 1949), Rapoport’s Abstract Expressionist work was given a solo exhibition at the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in 1963. She went on to explore pattern, painting on printed fabrics and developing a personal pictographic vocabulary using recontextualized stencils. In 1976 Rapoport began drawing on found computer printout paper, eventually leading to her reinvention as a digital artist. Her interactive installations used computer programs to gather, process, and represent data. An integral part of a community of artists experimenting with emerging computer technologies in the early 1980’s, Rapoport had an active role in MIT Press’ art, science, and technology journal Leonardo. Critical recognition of Rapoport’s contributions gained momentum in the last decade of her life.

Rapoport leaves a 66-year artistic legacy that includes works in a variety of media, including paintings, works on paper, performance artifacts, books, videos, and web art. Her name is recognized nationally and internationally through her participation in over fifty major exhibitions, including the Whitney Biennial (2006), Bienal de Arte, Buenos Aires (2002), Zero1 Biennial, Silicon Valley (2012), Violence Without Bodies, Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid (2005), and Documenta 8, Kassel, Germany (1987). She was the subject of late-career retrospective exhibitions at KALA Art Institute, Berkeley (2011), Mills College Art Museum, Oakland (2012), The Fresno Art Museum (2013) and the book Pairing of Polarities: The Life and Art of Sonya Rapoport, edited by Terri Cohn (Heyday, 2012). Her archives are preserved in the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley.


Casemore Kirkeby
1275 Minnesota Street, #102
San Francisco, CA 94107
415.851.9808

info@casemorekirkeby.com

Gallery Hours 
Tuesday – Saturday, 11am – 6pm

https://casemorekirkeby.com/exhibition/sonya-rapoport-an-aesthetic-response/

Jeannie O'Connor's HIV+ Photo Portraits Acquired by the SF Public Library

Jeannie O'Connor,  John, Oakland , 1988. Silver gelatin print, 4 x 5 inches.

Jeannie O'Connor, John, Oakland, 1988. Silver gelatin print, 4 x 5 inches.

Jeannie O'Connor,  Lovers Laughing, Oakland , 1988. Silver gelatin print, 4 x 5 inches.

Jeannie O'Connor, Lovers Laughing, Oakland, 1988. Silver gelatin print, 4 x 5 inches.

In the early 1990s, photographer Jeannie O'Connor was invited to be a guest artist at four Bay Area AIDS centers, including the Center for AIDS Services in Oakland, the Rest Stop and Shanti House centers on Market Street in San Francisco, and the Unity Church in Richmond.. She worked with HIV-positive clients and their families to take self-portraits, for many of them final, with a 4x5 camera using Polaroid film. O'Connor handed the pneumatic shutter-release bulb to the sitters, so they could choose the timing and the pose. The portrait sitters kept the instantly available prints while O'Connor kept the negatives. 365 negatives have now become an important visual testament to the diversity of lives lost.

KunstWorks is pleased to announce that O’Connor’s negatives, contact sheets, proof prints, and Polaroid prints from the AIDS Self-Portraits Collection (1989-1995) were recently included in the collection of the San Francisco Public Library. They will be made available to the public and a portion will become digitally available online through the Library’s AIDS archives digitization grant, “The San Francisco Bay Area’s Response to the AIDS Epidemic: Digitizing, Reuniting, and Providing Universal Access to Historical AIDS Records.” Learn about the Bay Area’s major AIDS archives digitization project, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.


O’Connor at the San Francisco Public Library’s History Center.

O’Connor at the San Francisco Public Library’s History Center.

Jeannie O'Connor's work has been shown internationally and was awarded the SECA award by SFMOMA and the Phelan award in Photography. She taught art and photography at California College of the Arts, the San Francisco Art Institute, and Berkeley City College.

O'Connor graduated from UC Berkeley in 1969 with a master's degree in painting. Throughout her career, she has taken portraits, often combining photographic images with paint, pastel, and collage. The 4 x 5 polaroid Type 55 self-portrait process offered a means to work sensitively and responsibly across many situations, including at Creative Growth Art Center and for the California Arts Council AIDS project.

APAG West Seminar a Success

APAG West Seminar a Success

KunstWorks was happy to co-host American Photography Archives Group West’s inaugural seminar. Alla Efimova, Melanie Light, and Alan Selsor chaired the committee to recruit a stellar line up of speakers—curators, photography archive managers, and attorneys—to address the most important topics in advancing the legacies of contemporary photographers. It was a busy day of presentations on photography archives and collections, issues in photographers’ legacy planning, and lively discussions. We are planning engaging events and workshops throughout the year, and look forward to the next year’s seminar in the Fall of 2019.

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Eva Joseph's prints and paintings dazzle

Eva Joseph,  Untitled , ca. 1985. Print. 15 1/2 x 20 inches.

Eva Joseph, Untitled, ca. 1985. Print. 15 1/2 x 20 inches.

KunstWorks is pleased to share the treasure trove of rarely seen prints and paintings by Eva Joseph, the brilliant German-American artist whose work blends Bay Area Figurative painting with midcentury modern graphic design and the technique of Japanese woodblock printing. This website dedicated to her work is an important new resource to understand the artist’s unique contribution to West Coast painting and Bay Area art history.

Explore the website at https://www.evajoseph.com.

Eva Joseph,  Untitled , n.d. Oil on canvas. 36 x 36 inches.

Eva Joseph, Untitled, n.d. Oil on canvas. 36 x 36 inches.

APAG West Announces Inaugural Seminar

We are delighted to announce that KunstWorks Principal Alla Efimova will chair the committee for the first American Photography Archives Group (APAG) seminar to take place on the West Coast.

Many thanks to Melanie Light and Alan Selsor for helping recruit a stellar line up of speakers—curators, photography archive managers, and attorneys—to address the most important topics in advancing the legacies of contemporary photographers. 

APAG West Inaugural Seminar
Sunday, October 14
UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism
9:30 am – 6:30 pm

View the program for the inaugural APAG West Seminar to learn more about the event. To join APAG as a member and/or register for the seminar, click HERE.

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KunstWorks awarded Berkeley Civic Arts Commission grant for book

Photos and notes are spread out on a table at Nabolom Bakery in Berkeley, where Moira Roth spent time composing her experimental narrative. KunstWorks was recently awarded a grant to transform the project into a publication.

Photos and notes are spread out on a table at Nabolom Bakery in Berkeley, where Moira Roth spent time composing her experimental narrative. KunstWorks was recently awarded a grant to transform the project into a publication.

We are pleased to announce that the Berkeley Civic Arts Commission awarded a grant for developing the book Through the Eyes of Rachel Marker by Moira Roth and edited by Alla Efimova. KunstWorks is working with Roth to publish her experimental novel tracing the life of a fictional protagonist who witnessed firsthand the major events in twentieth-century European history. Mostly unpublished, this lyrical, perceptive, and cautionary tale is more relevant now than ever.

A leading international voice in feminism, performance, and contemporary art, Roth has authored three acclaimed books on art and published dozens of essays in addition to creating her own performance works. She is a professor emerita of art history at Mills College and has taught at various times at UC Irvine, UC Santa Cruz, and UC San Diego. Roth’s pioneering work on artists ranging from Marcel Duchamp to Faith Ringgold and Rachel Rosenthal won her numerous achievement awards, including the 2006 National Recognition in the Arts Award from the College Arts Association.

First Opportunity to View Aulerich-Sugai Cell Painting from 1988

Ed Aulerich-Sugai,  Cells: C-28 , 1988. Water-based media on paper; 43.75 x 35 inches. Collection of the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Ed Aulerich-Sugai, Cells: C-28, 1988. Water-based media on paper; 43.75 x 35 inches. Collection of the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

This summer, the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive will exhibit a rarely seen work by Ed Aulerich-Sugai in the exhibition Way Bay 2. Never publicly shown, the work represents one of a series of mixed media works on paper produced between 1986 – 1989. The Cells series, including over 100 paintings and drawings, displays a broad range in the use of color, form, and texture. In 1988, Aulerich-Sugai completed the painting currently on display at BAMPFA, Cells: C-28, in response to his diagnosis the previous autumn with HIV-related illnesses. The work represents an interrogation of his illness and the virus weakening his immune system. The painting's composition was influenced by Aulerich-Sugai's study of ukiyo-e woodblock prints.

As the second iteration of an innovatively organized exhibition of art, film, performance, poetry, and archival materials, Way Bay 2 continues BAMPFA's wide-ranging exploration of the creative energies that have emerged from the San Francisco Bay Area over two centuries. The exhibition features almost two hundred works by Bay Area artists and others whose work engages directly with the region’s geographic and cultural landscape and highlights dozens of recent acquisitions. Of these new acquisitions, many bring a focus to the ways women and people of color have contributed their voices to historic cultural moments in the Bay. Way Bay 2 is on view at BAMPFA from June 13 – September 2, 2018.

Sonya Rapoport's work finds new audience in 2018

Sonya Rapoport's work finds new audience in 2018

Throughout 2018, Sonya Rapoport's legacy and spirit of experimentation is being highlighted through a number of exhibitions and events across the Bay Area: San Francisco's Minnesota Street Projects featured Rapoport's drawing in a group exhibition organized by Romer Young Gallery; the Berkeley Art Museum exhibited her work in a major collection show; and in an upcoming musical performance, Berkeley's Kala Art Institute will focus on her Anasazi series as a source for new creative interpretations by composer-performer team Hae Voces.

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Acquisitions at BAMPFA to be shown in upcoming exhibition "Way Bay"

Acquisitions at BAMPFA to be shown in upcoming exhibition "Way Bay"

We are pleased to announce that the work of two artists whose estates KunstWorks has advised will be included in the upcoming show Way Bay at the Berkeley Art Museum. Sonya Rapoport's Survey Chart #19 (1971) and Ed Aulerich-Sugai's Ghosts and Demons: Diptych (1989) will be on display at BAMPFA from January 17–May 6, 2018.

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